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How do you understand who your social media audience is? Check out this handy guide from @buffer https://blog.bufferapp.com/social-media-audience

How vertical video is driving the BBC’s mobile traffic https://digiday.com/media/vertical-video-driving-bbcs-mobile-traffic/ via @digiday

Why 10 Is Actually The Best Number To Use In Blog Titles via @venngage https://venngage.com/blog/blog-titles/

How To Write Longer Content Like A Pro – The Startup – Medium

How Joe Daniels creates his articles: 

The Focus:

Explain briefly what you’re going to talk about. What is the focus?

Leading Them In:

Most people will have a base knowledge of the subject. This is where you clarify that base knowledge and lead them in to the topic.

Sit Up And Pay Attention:

With the help of stats or expert opinion, show the audience that the topic is super important and they really, really need to take notice.

The Meat:

This is the premise of the article, explaining what you have to say on the topic.

Something To Take Away:

Once you’ve explained the theory, you need to give them something practical that they can go away and work with.

Bring It All Together:

Finish off by summarizing and bringing together the key points of the article.

Six data protection principles

3 min read

Six data protection principles form the basis of the processing of personal data and are of crucial importance. This processing must be based on these principles that can be found in Article 5(1) GDPR.

  1. The first principle concerns lawfulness, fairness and transparency. It requires that personal data are processed in a lawful, fair and transparent manner in relation to data subjects. Transparency implies that any information and communication concerning the processing of personal data must be easily accessible and easy to understand. Also, clear and plain language needs to be used in this regard. More specifically, this principle ensures data subject receive information on the identity of controllers and purposes of the processing of personal data.
  2. The second principle is that of purpose limitation. It means that personal data are to be collected only for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes and it is not allowed to process them further in a way that is not compatible with those purposes. One should bear in mind, however, that further processing for the purposes of the public interest, scientific or historical research or statistical purposes is not considered as incompatible with the initial purposes and is therefore allowed.
  3. As the third principle, we need to refer to data minimisation. According to this principle, personal data must be adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary in relation to the purposes for which they are processed. Essentially, it means that data cannot be processed unless it is needed to process them in order achieve the above-mentioned purposes.
  4. Accuracy is the fourth principle meaning that it is required to ensure that personal data are accurate and are kept up to date where it is necessary. Personal data that are inaccurate – considering the purposes for their processing – must be deleted or rectified without any delay.
  5. The fifth principle is storage limitation. It entails that personal data must be kept in a form that makes it possible to identify data subjects for no longer than is necessary for the purposes of the processing. Storing these data for longer periods is allowed when the processing of the data will aim at achieving purposes in the public interest, scientific or historical research purposes or statistical purposes. Nevertheless, also in these cases rights and freedoms of data subjects must be safeguarded.
  6. Finally, the sixth principle of integrity and confidentiality requires that in the processing of personal data appropriate security of personal data is ensured. This should include protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing, destruction and damage. Appropriate technical or organisational measures are to be taken in order to comply with this requirement: such data security measures can include the use of encryption and authentication and authorisation mechanisms.

 

 The 7 Principles of Privacy by Design

  1. The Privacy by Design approach must adopt a proactive rather than reactive stance and aim at preventing privacy risks and not at addressing them after they occur;
  2. Privacy is to be used as a default setting;
  3. Privacy must be embedded into design;
  4. Privacy by Design ensures full functionality and seeks to achieve both privacy and security;
  5. Security must be made an integral part of the systems throughout their whole lifecycle;
  6. It seeks to achieve visibility and transparency;
  7. Systems are to be kept user-centric and users interests and needs must be taken into account.

 

 

Is Facebook Messenger the New Email? 3 Experiments to Find Out

Here's an interesting use for Messenger from the folks at Hubspot.

  1. Using Facebook Messenger as a Content Delivery Channel
  2. Getting Event Attendees to Participate Through Facebook Messenger
  3. Using Facebook Messenger in Place of Forms

Blogging Statistics and Trends: The 2017 Survey of 1000+ Bloggers

The survey breaks down into 11 questions in three broad categories:

1. Changes In The Blogging Process

  • How long does it take to write a blog post?
  • How frequently do bloggers publish?
  • Are bloggers using editors?
  • Where and when do bloggers write?

2. Trends on Blog Content

  • How long is your typical blog post?
  • What do bloggers include in their content?
  • Is guest posting still a popular practice?
  • Are bloggers updating older articles?

3. Blogging Promotion and Measurement

  • How is your content typically promoted?
  • How often do bloggers check analytics?
  • Are bloggers driving results?

For each question, we’ll present the survey data along with analysis showing which types of bloggers are reporting the best results. And finally, we’ll share the insights of experts and friends.

Read the full article now!